Thursday, 29 May 2014

Iconic Jewels

Queen Marie Jose’s Emerald and Diamond Necklace. Once owned by the last royalty of Italy, Queen Marie Jose. She was known for having an extensive collection of jewels including this diamond necklace. This necklace contains 50 emeralds and was created by Van Cleef and Arpels.
Spanish Flamenco dancer Anita Delgado spent most of her life in Jagatjit Singh’s kingdom in the foothills of the Himalayas, as the Maharaja’s fifth wife and the Maharani of Kapurthala. She lived a life of unbelievable luxury.

Her jewels were sold in Christie's in London on December 12 2007.
The Love At First Sight diamond. A heart shaped diamond weighing 56.15 carats with a rating of IF Type IIa, color D. It was originally cut from the Cullinan Diamond.

The diamond fetched $12 million at a Christie’s auction in 2011.
This tiara belonged to Swedish princess, and the Countess Consort Princess Katharina Henckel von Donnersmarck. The tiara is 101.27 carats in weight and was sold by Sotheby’s sale of Magnificent Jewels in late 2011 for $12.7M.
The Shizuka Diamond - is the largest colorless diamond to have sold at an auction in Asia. The shield-shaped diamond features 92 facets. It was carved out of a rough diamond of 460 carats.

It sold for $6.21m in February 2009.
Flawless Blue Diamond - it took no more than 15 minutes via telephone for this flawless blue diamond to command a record price at a Sotheby’s auction in Geneva in 2009. The stone brought $9.3 million or $1.3 million per carat.




Tuesday, 27 May 2014

Ancient gold mine of Sakdrissi

In 2004, German archaeologists from Ruhr-University Bochum discovered the gold mine in Sakdrissi, Georgia. Dated to the third millennium BC, it is one of the oldest known gold mines in the world and has been deemed the most important prehistoric mining site in Europe. Using stone hammers and antler picks the Bronze Age miners worked the mine to obtain the precious metal.
The nine-hectare site, called Sakdrisi-Kachagiani, lies several kilometres from Dmanisi, a small village in the Kvemo Kartli region of Georgia.
The mine is 150 feet below the surface and the walls show fire-setting and crushing work with hammers. Research has determined that it was in use for 600 years between 3,400 BC and 2,800 BC.

A remarkable array of finds within the mine allowed a detailed understanding of how the ore was mined, processed and prepared for use over 5000 years ago.
The initial excavation at the gold mine was complemented by work on an Early Bronze Age settlement and the nearby area of Dmanisi is a significant site for the study of human origins. Early human fossils discovered at Dmanisi, dubbed Homo georgicus, were found between 1991 and 2005. At 1.8 million years old, H. georgicus may have been a separate species of Homo, predating Homo erectus, and represent the earliest stage of human presence in the Caucasus.

The hominid remains are the oldest found outside of Africa. Then, last year, archaeologists made another dramatic discovery, a fifth skull which prompted scientists to hypothesise that all Homo species may not have been multiple human species at all, but instead variants of a single species.
Although the site had been given protection according to Georgian Heritage laws in 2006, the election of a new government saw pressure put on the ministry of culture. A commission was set up at the beginning of June 2013 to remove the status of Sakdrissi as a protected monument.

A gold mining company called RMG Limited have now obtained the mineral rights. Its proposed opencast gold mine will swallow the area of prehistoric mining.
In a letter to the Georgian government, Professor Dr Hermann Parzinger, President of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation and German Association of Archaeology, said: “Sakdrisi is the oldest gold mine worldwide and therefore a unique heritage site not only of Georgia, but of mankind. It should not be sacrificed to pure economic interests.” He added, “not just Georgia, also Europe, will lose one of its most important prehistoric mining sites forever.
The Caucasus was one of the most important ore-containing mountain ranges of the ancient world.
As the country of the “Golden Fleece”, it includes the western part of Georgia, Colchis, a name synonymous, in ancient times, with an abundance of gold. The giant Prometheus, the first ever “metallurgist”, was chained to the rocks of the Caucasus by the gods, and even today archaeologists are overwhelmed by the abundance of metals in the prehistoric find complexes in this region.




http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-evolution-human-origins/what-worth-more-gold-or-knowledge-about-human-origins-001451



Sunday, 25 May 2014

Famous Diamonds IV

The Chopard Chameleon Diamond is a 31.32 carat oval-cut chameleon diamond and the largest known.

The chameleon diamond has the ability to temporarily change colour after heating or long storage in the dark.
The Nur-ul-ain, “light of the eye” is a brilliant-cut oval diamond of around 60 carats. Together with the even larger Darya-i-noor diamond, it is considered one of the two most-celebrated gems among the Iranian crown jewels.
The Darya-i-noor, ‘sea of light’ is the world’s largest pink diamond, weighing 186 carats. It is table cut with exceptional clarity. The diamond came from India's famous Golconda mine and is part of the crown jewels of Iran.
The Portuguese Diamond weighs 127.01 carats and is graded M in color and VS-1 in clarity, with very strong blue fluorescence. Its unusual octagonal emerald cut makes it one of the world's most magnificent gems.
The Moon Of Baroda is a 24.04 carat canary yellow diamond once worn by both Empress Therese of Austria and Marilyn Monroe.
The Golden Eye. This 43.51 carat internally flawless fancy yellow diamond was seized in a drug sting and auctioned off by the U.S. Government in 2011 for $2,480,000.




See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2013/10/chameleon-diamonds.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/04/the-imperial-crown-jewels-of-iran.html


Wednesday, 21 May 2014

The Cheapside Hoard - London's Lost Jewels

The Museum of London is concluding a major exhibition investigating the secrets of the Cheapside Hoard.
The Cheapside Hoard is a hoard of late 16th and early 17th century jewellery discovered by workmen using a pickaxe to excavate in a cellar near Cheapside in London in 1912.

They found a buried wooden box containing over 400 pieces of Elizabethan and Jacobean jewellery, including rings, brooches and chains, with bright coloured gemstones and enamelled settings.
The hoard of almost 500 pieces was a 17th-century goldsmith's stock – worth a king's ransom then and priceless now.

"Nothing in the world comes close," said Museum of London curator Hazel Forsyth, who has spent years studying the brooches and necklaces, rings and chains, pearls and rubies, scent bottles and fan holders, two carved gems which date back 1,300 years to Byzantium – and a watch set into a hollow carved out of one stupendous emerald which was originally the size of an apple.



Gold bow pendant set with rose-cut and step-cut foil-backed rubies and table-cut diamonds

Gold and enamel pendant set with two sapphires and an irregular polished spinel.


http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/london-wall/Whats-on/Exhibitions-Displays/Londons-Lost-Jewels/Default.htm