Monday, 29 September 2014

Gold of the Achaemenid Empire

The Achaemenid Empire (c. 550–330 BCE), was an empire in Western and Central Asia, founded in the 6th century BCE by Cyrus the Great.

The dynasty draws its name from king Achaemenes, who ruled Persis between 705 BCE and 675 BCE. The empire expanded to eventually rule over much of the ancient world which at around 500 BCE stretched from the Indus Valley in the east, to Thrace and Macedon on the northeastern border of Greece, making it the biggest empire the world had yet seen. The Achaemenid Empire would eventually control Egypt as well.

Panoramic view of the Naqsh-e Rustam. This site contains the tombs of four Achaemenid kings, including those of Darius I and Xerxes.
In 480 BCE, it is estimated that 50 million people lived in the Achaemenid Empire or about 44% of the world's population at the time, making it by population the largest empire.

Alexander the Great (Alexander III of Macedon) defeated the Persian armies at Granicus (334 BCE), followed by Issus (333 BCE), and lastly at Gaugamela (331 BCE).

Afterwards, he marched on Susa and Persepolis which surrendered in early 330 BCE.



See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/02/ancient-gold-coins-redux.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/02/ultra-cool-ancient-gold-coins-ii.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/04/the-prospero-collection.html



Sunday, 28 September 2014

Worst Cars ever produced


AMC Gremlin (1970-1978)
Launched on April Fool's Day in 1970, the Gremlin marked the beginning of the end for American Motors. Although AMC built a number of terrible cars the Gremlin is generally agreed upon as the worst of them all.

It was a small, rust-prone car that guzzled fuel like a vehicle several times its size. The Gremlin's handling was atrocious, its engine was crippled by emissions control equipment, and the flip-up back window was prone to breaking off in a driver's hands.

AMC Pacer 1975-1981
The Pacer is an enduring symbol of bad taste. The Pacer featured tall, wraparound windows that gave it the look of a rolling fishbowl. AMC spent millions promoting the car, but it was a sales flop.

Although it was a gas guzzler and a rust bucket, the Pacer's hideous looks were its main calling card.

Bond Bug Three-Wheeler (1970-1974)
The Bond Bug was created in an era when designers were entranced with fiberglass. Freed from the costly process required to bend sheet metal, they went wild with the new composite material. The result - a vehicle that looked like an upside down hot tub with windows.

The Bug was a sales disaster with just 2000 sold and drove its manufacturer into bankruptcy.

Bricklin SV1 ( 1974-1976)
New Brunswick premier Richard Hatfield should have passed on Malcolm Bricklin's SV1 project. Hatfield funded the project anyway. Only a handful of the fiberglass-bodied SV1's were ever built, and the project was plagued with problems that ranged from inadequate brakes to a leaking rear hatch.

The SV1 suffered from crippling design flaws and construction quality that resembled a Soviet-era Lada.

Chevrolet Chevette 1975-1987
Rushed into production as a slap-dash response to an OPEC oil embargo that created a market for small cars, the sub-compact Chevette earned a reputation as a car that drove even worse than it looked.
The engine was rough, the suspension was crude, and the interior was lined with shiny plastic. Construction quality of the early Chevettes epitomized mid-1970's Detroit for shoddy workmanship.




See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/07/the-ford-edsel.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/08/the-corvair.html


Saturday, 27 September 2014

The HMS Sussex

The HMS Sussex was an 80-gun ship of the English Royal Navy, lost in a severe storm on 1 March 1694 off Gibraltar.

Pride of the Royal Navy, the flagship of Admiral Sir Francis Wheler was built in April 1693 and sailed from Portsmouth on December 27, 1693, escorting a fleet of 48 warships and 166 merchant ships to the Mediterranean.

Suspected to be on board were 10 tons of gold coins.
A violent storm hit the flotilla near the Strait of Gibraltar and in the early morning of March 1, 1694 the HMS Sussex sank, joining the fate of 12 other ships of the fleet. Only two survived of the 500 crew on board. Admiral Wheler's body was found on the eastern shore of the rock of Gibraltar two days later 'much mangled'.

There were approximately 1,200 casualties in total, in what remains one of the worst disasters in the history of the Royal Navy.
The sinking of the Sussex was observed by several eyewitnesses who later testified at a hearing held by the Royal Navy. Two vessels also witnessed her sinking and reported the loss in their logs.

Historical records suggest that a shipment of money equal to a million pounds sterling was destined for Savoy, shipped aboard HMS Sussex. The secret funds never reached Savoy. Compelling evidence suggests that the enormous payment went down with the ship.
Between 1998 and 2001, Odyssey Marine Exploration searched for the HMS Sussex and announced that it had located the shipwreck at a depth of 800 metres.

Due to various conflicted interests Odyessey has "postponed further work on the project to allow diplomatic issues to be resolved."


http://www.shipwreck.net/hmssussexhistoryoverview.php