Friday, 28 November 2014

How Diamonds became Forever

It was in 1947 when the real-life copywriter Frances Gerety coined the phrase “A Diamond Is Forever.”

As Ms. Gerety recalled in a 1988 interview with a co-worker, Howard Davis, she had just finished a series of ads and was headed to bed when she realized that she had forgotten to create a signature line. Exhausted, she said “Dear God, send me a line,” and scribbled something on a slip of paper. When she woke up and saw what she had written, she thought it was just O.K.
A few hours later, she presented her idea at a meeting. According to her, “Nobody jumped.” It’s hard to imagine a time when diamond engagement rings were not the norm. Last year, Americans spent almost $7 billion on the rings. But in 1938, when a De Beers representative wrote to N. W. Ayer to inquire whether “the use of propaganda in various forms” might boost the sale of diamonds in the United States, their popularity had been on a downward trend, in part because of the Depression.
N.W. Ayer conducted extensive surveys of consumer attitudes and found that most Americans thought diamonds were a luxury for the ultra-wealthy. Women wanted their men to spend money on “a washing machine, or a new car, anything but an engagement ring,” Ms. Gerety said in 1988. “It was considered just absolutely money down the drain.”

Still, the agency set an ambitious goal: “to create a situation where almost every person pledging marriage feels compelled to acquire a diamond engagement ring.”
“Sentiment is essential to your advertising, as it is to your product,” it counseled De Beers in a memo, “for the emotional connotation of the diamond is the one competitive advantage which no other product can claim or dispute.”

Meanwhile, Ms. Gerety was busy making sure average consumers saw diamonds everywhere. Her theory was that “the big ones sell the little ones.”
In the 1950s, N. W. Ayer started lending jewels to socialites and starlets for the Academy Awards and the Kentucky Derby. The campaign was a success from the start. After just two years, the sale of diamonds in the United States increased by 55 percent. In its 1951 annual report, N. W. Ayer noted that, “for a number of years we have found evidence that the diamond engagement ring tradition is consistently growing stronger. Jewelers now tell us ‘a girl is not engaged unless she has a diamond engagement ring.’ ”
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/05/fashion/weddings/how-americans-learned-to-love-diamonds.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

A Diamond Is Forever,” has appeared in every De Beers engagement ad since 1948. In 1999, two weeks before the never married Ms. Gerety died at the age of 83, Advertising Age named it the slogan of the century.




Birth of Venus by Botticelli




Thursday, 27 November 2014

DeBeers selects Kleven for newest diamond ship

(IDEX Online News) – De Beers has selected Norwegian shipbuilder Kleven to build a tailor-made ship for deep sea mineral exploration off the coast of Namibia.

Kleven said the vessel would be the "first of its kind" and will work on a large area offshore where over three million years the Orange River deposited sediments containing diamonds.
Marin Teknikk says the De Beers vessel will be similar to earlier MT 6022 designs, but the internal arrangement will be different. Below deck and the entire aft deck will be installed with equipment designed for underwater mineral activity. The ship is 113 metres and has a beam of 22 metres. The vessel will be able to operate at depths of up to 150 metres. Up to 80 people can be housed. The ship will be deployed offshore for up to three years at a time, with crew transfers and supplies handled by smaller vessels or helicopters.
The vessel will be built at Kleven Verft in Ulsteinvik, Norway, and is scheduled to be delivered in June 2016.




See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/06/debmarine-namibia-going-deeper-revisited.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/03/diamonds-of-namibia.html
See -----> http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/07/debswana-is-to-install-full-body-x-ray.html


Monday, 24 November 2014

Gemstones of Elizabeth Taylor

Elizabeth Taylor (February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011) was married eight times to seven husbands. When asked why she married so often, she replied, "I don't know, honey. It sure beats the hell out of me," but then added, "I was taught by my parents that if you fall in love, if you want to have a love affair, you get married. I guess I'm very old-fashioned."

The Elizabeth Taylor Jewelry Collection set a new world record (by a very large margin) for the most valuable private collection of jewels sold at auction, bringing $115,932,000 in 2011.
La Peregrina is one of the most famous pearls in the world. Its history spans almost 500 years. Richard Burton purchased the pearl at the Sotheby's auction for $37,000. He gave it to his wife, Elizabeth Taylor, as a Valentine's Day gift during their first marriage. The pearl sold for a record price of more than $11 million.
The Elizabeth Taylor Diamond is a 33.19-carat Asscher-cut D color potentially flawless diamond set on a ring that Taylor wore nearly everyday.

It sold for $8.8 million, well above its $2.5 million to $3.5 million estimate.
The BVLGARI Emerald Suite, a suite of emerald and diamond jewelry brought a total of $24,799,000. It was acquired between 1962 and 1967.
The BVLGARI Sapphire Sautoir, set with a sugarloaf cabochon sapphire of 52.72 carats sold for $5,906,500.

This bold Art Deco style sautoir was a gift from Richard Burton for Elizabeth Taylor’s 40th birthday in 1972.
The Taj Mahal Diamond, on a gold and ruby chain, by Cartier realized $8,818,500, setting a world auction record for an Indian jewel.

Inscribed with the name Nur Jahan, the wife of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahangir, this heart-shaped diamond is believed to have been a gift from the ruler to his son, who became the great emperor Shah Jahan (1592-1666).
The Cartier Ruby Suite, a suite of ruby and diamond jewelry realized a total of $5,403,500.

Comprising a necklace, bracelet and earrings, Elizabeth Taylor’s husband, the film producer Mike Todd, presented her with a trio of Cartier boxes containing this magnificent suite of ruby jewels while she was swimming laps in the pool at their villa in St.-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, in August 1957.
The Richard Burton Ruby and Diamond Ring, of 8.24 carats, by Van Cleef & Arpels, was a gift from Richard Burton, Christmas 1968. He had promised to buy Elizabeth Taylor a special ruby, with perfect red color, “But it has to be perfect”, he warned.

Four years after making his promise, he tucked a small box into the bottom of Elizabeth’s Christmas stocking – so small that she missed it when opening her gifts. This ring achieved $4,226,500 setting a record for a ruby per carat ($512,925).
The Night of the Iguana Brooch, by Tiffany & Co. sold for $1,202,500. More catfish in form than iguana, Richard Burton gave the brooch to Elizabeth Taylor to wear to the star-studded premiere of his film The Night of the Iguana, in 1964.